uispeccoll

uispeccoll:

uispeccoll:

Miniature…Tuesday!  (Didn’t quite finish these gifs yesterday for Miniature Monday.)

Advice from Polonius rendered as a miniature artist’s book and stored in a mini Globe Theater.

Hamlet. Act I. Scene III. Polonius’ P’s & Q’s / by Wm. Shakespeare ; as presented by Poole Press, 2002 ; [designed and produced by Maryline P. Adams]  Berkeley, Calif. : Poole Press, c2002.

Stop by and see, it’s in the Smith Miniatures Collection  PR2807.A3  P6 2002.

This post was referenced and this book was shown in our Live Stream today.  Missed the Live Stream?  You can still watch the “archived” video! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVceEwlIFJs 

randominternetstuffs

knitmeapony:

alykat86:

authorkurikuri:

tom-sits-like-a-whore:

who is on your team, captain?

#completely convinced marvel just finds the actual characters to play their parts

Marvel’s casting department cannot be beat. Literally all of the actors are their characters.

Sarah Halley Finn, casting director for Iron Man, Iron Man 2, Thor, Captain America, The Avengers, Iron Man 3, Thor: Dark World, Captain America: Winter Soldier, Agents of SHIELD, Guardians of the Galaxy, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Ant-Man, and every single Marvel one-shot. All hail the queen. 

ALL HAIL THE QUEEN!!!

ALL HAIL

How do you get to be a casting director??

libralthinking
onefourkidlit:

OneFour KidLit author Jen Malone has started an exciting new venture called The Margin Project! Check it out!
What It Is:
Lots of things are way more fun when shared with a friend, whether it’s videogames played together via remote headsets or TV shows watched while following a Twitter hashtag. But for the most part, reading has remained a solitary activity. Sometimes that’s what’s so great about it. Other times, it would be kind of cool to know exactly what your BFF thought of that scene on page 116, wouldn’t it? 
The Margin Project puts forth an odd notion: that it’s okay to write in books. Not all of them, and definitely not ones that belong to your school or library (unless it’s designated part of The Margin Project, that is), but some of them. Specifically, books that have a bookplate in the front proclaiming “This Book Is Part of The Margin Project.” Then it’s totally okay to write in it. What do you write? Anything that pertains to your thoughts and feelings as you read. You can even doodle a picture- maybe a teardrop if it’s a sad scene or a heart if there’s a line you adore. Just keep it clean and friendly and everyone’s happy! 
How It Works:
Your teacher or librarian can designate books in your classroom or library, or you can choose ones from your personal collection, to be part of The Margin Project by placing the special bookplate in the front of the book (use the free printable template below). Then mark away as you read. When you’re done, share it with a friend. It’s tons of fun to get it back later and see what others had to say as they read. You can each pick a different color pen to write with or use a symbol before each of your comments, if you’re sharing with more than one person. A simple key on the back page (purple pen = Kristen or $ = Sarah) will let every reader know who said what. 
Who It’s For:
The Margin Project is great for classrooms, library reading groups, mother-daughter book clubs, Girl or Boy Scout troops, pen pals, far-flung family members, or close-by family members- basically, anyone you want to share a reading experience with. Or mark up your own book and leave it on a bench for a stranger to find! 
How It Came To Be:
In late 2013, a number of 2014 debut authors began sending advance copies of their books “on tour” via mail to other authors, in order to help spread the word of their upcoming releases. As great as it was to read the printed words, the notes and drawings the writers left on each other’s book as they read were just as much fun! (See some examples to the left.) And it got me thinking. Anything that makes reading even more fun just has to be shared, right? Right! Which is also why it would be great if you’d share snapshots of your own Margin Project experiences on this Pinterest page. See what others are reading and writing and get ideas of your own. 
(via Author Jen Malone Site | MARGIN PROJECT)

onefourkidlit:

OneFour KidLit author Jen Malone has started an exciting new venture called The Margin Project! Check it out!

What It Is:

Lots of things are way more fun when shared with a friend, whether it’s videogames played together via remote headsets or TV shows watched while following a Twitter hashtag. But for the most part, reading has remained a solitary activity. Sometimes that’s what’s so great about it. Other times, it would be kind of cool to know exactly what your BFF thought of that scene on page 116, wouldn’t it?

The Margin Project puts forth an odd notion: that it’s okay to write in books. Not all of them, and definitely not ones that belong to your school or library (unless it’s designated part of The Margin Project, that is), but some of them. Specifically, books that have a bookplate in the front proclaiming “This Book Is Part of The Margin Project.” Then it’s totally okay to write in it. What do you write? Anything that pertains to your thoughts and feelings as you read. You can even doodle a picture- maybe a teardrop if it’s a sad scene or a heart if there’s a line you adore. Just keep it clean and friendly and everyone’s happy! 

How It Works:

Your teacher or librarian can designate books in your classroom or library, or you can choose ones from your personal collection, to be part of The Margin Project by placing the special bookplate in the front of the book (use the free printable template below). Then mark away as you read. When you’re done, share it with a friend. It’s tons of fun to get it back later and see what others had to say as they read. You can each pick a different color pen to write with or use a symbol before each of your comments, if you’re sharing with more than one person. A simple key on the back page (purple pen = Kristen or $ = Sarah) will let every reader know who said what.

Who It’s For:

The Margin Project is great for classrooms, library reading groups, mother-daughter book clubs, Girl or Boy Scout troops, pen pals, far-flung family members, or close-by family members- basically, anyone you want to share a reading experience with. Or mark up your own book and leave it on a bench for a stranger to find!

How It Came To Be:

In late 2013, a number of 2014 debut authors began sending advance copies of their books “on tour” via mail to other authors, in order to help spread the word of their upcoming releases. As great as it was to read the printed words, the notes and drawings the writers left on each other’s book as they read were just as much fun! (See some examples to the left.) And it got me thinking. Anything that makes reading even more fun just has to be shared, right? Right! Which is also why it would be great if you’d share snapshots of your own Margin Project experiences on this Pinterest page. See what others are reading and writing and get ideas of your own.

(via Author Jen Malone Site | MARGIN PROJECT)